Breaking Busy

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I’m used to Christian non-fiction books being good, but a bit slower reads for me.  Breaking Busy pleasantly surprised me by being a quick and engaging read!  I was able to dive into this and get swept up in the stories.  Though, the book also packs a lot to think about.  I am planning to go back through to dig into the questions at the end of the chapters with a journal so that I can put some change into action.  Many of the questions allowed for self-reflection and  helped apply the information in a personal way.  These were a great addition for quick readers so that they can go back with intention without letting the book become another one with good ideas but no change.

I loved how the book incorporated a lot of stories both highlighting how “busy” can get in the way and how certain practices have helped individuals break out of the “busy” addiction.  The author was vulnerable in sharing many of her own areas of struggle and how she made different choices.  She also included her decision making framework, which I thought added some fun tips and ideas.  Making decisions can be hard so it’s nice having more tools around.  The chapter on our thoughts also incorporated some great, tired and true psychology methods founded on biblical truths.  I thought this was a great addition for the book since our thoughts can often spur on our busy lives.  One of my big take-aways was to ask myself whether I am spending more time admiring other people’s lives on Instagram, Facebook, or Pinterest or if I am investing in my own life so that I can love God and love others.

The book seems geared toward Christian women who are living fast-paced busy lives, but want a change or want to find purpose and focus for their lives.

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookLook Bloggers <http://booklookbloggers.com> book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 <http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html> : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

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